Boil Water Notice on Oct. 17, 2019 in Denton

Notice Applies to Area Generally South of I-35, North of Highland Park Road, West of Kendolph Drive, and East of Western Boulevard

***Update – Oct. 19 Customers in Affected Area No Longer Need to Boil Water Before Consumption

***Update – Oct. 18, 10:21 a.m.: The Boil Water Notice issued Thursday, Oct. 17 remains in effect. The notice only affects approximately 600 customers in the area generally south of IH35, north of Highland Park Road, west of Kendolph Drive, and east of Western Boulevard. If you are outside this area, you do not need to boil water.

The City of Denton will provide another update this afternoon. Please periodically check the City’s website and social media.***

Posted at 6:40 p.m.

The official boil water notice is located below this press release and is linked here.

The City of Denton issued a Boil Water Notice on Oct. 17, 2019, for customers in the area generally south of IH35, north of Highland Park Road, west of Kendolph Drive, and east of Western Boulevard (see map below). Approximately 600 customers are affected.

The Boil Water Notice was issued after University of North Texas staff notified the City of Denton of an unauthorized cross-connection between a stormwater pond and the City’s public water distribution system on the UNT campus near Apogee Stadium at approximately 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019.

At approximately 4 p.m., City Utilities staff mobilized immediately and began closing water distribution system valves to isolate the area expected to have been compromised, reducing the area of concern. Extensive water distribution flushing at fire hydrants will continue for several hours. The City of Denton Municipal Laboratory personnel mobilized the afternoon of Thursday, Oct. 17 to begin collecting bacteriological samples to confirm water quality meets regulatory standards in the area of concern. The City maintains disinfectant within the water delivered by the distribution system to safeguard against bacteriological contamination.

Residents in the affected area should not drink water without boiling it first. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for two minutes, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.

This Boil Water Notice will remain in effect for the area of concern until tests confirm that the quality of the drinking water meets State and Federal drinking water standards. The testing process is expected to take at least 24 hours.

The City will inform customers when tests confirm that no harmful bacteria are present in the drinking water supply. Further information will be provided at www.cityofdenton.com and on the City’s social media.

For general information, please contact the City of Denton Utilities at (940) 349-7000.

Please share this information with people who may drink water in the affected area, especially those who may not have received this notice). You can do this by posting the attached notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

Contact: Ryan Adams, (940) 349-8565, Ryan.Adams@cityofdenton.com

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MORE INFORMATION ON THE BOIL WATER NOTICE

Why does Denton issue boil water notices?
As a precaution when contamination within the water system is suspected, Denton Water Utilities can request that customers boil their water or use bottled water until water sample lab test results become available.

What is a boil water notice?
A boil water notice is a public statement advising people to boil their tap water before using it, typically in response to an event that has (or could have) introduced contaminants into the water distribution system. Such events include a large water main break, widespread loss of system pressure, or results of routine sample testing in the system. Although waterborne diseases are extremely rare, they can be serious. The risk is higher for infants, the elderly and persons with immune deficiency disorders. Denton Water Utilities issues boil-water notices even if the possibility of contamination is remote to safeguard the health of the community.

What do I need to do to make sure my water is safe to drink and use?
You should boil tap water vigorously for at least two minutes prior to using it for drinking or cooking (the minute starts when the water begins to bubble). This includes water used for brushing teeth, making ice, washing raw foods, preparation of drinks and water for pets. Wait for the water to cool before using it or store it in the refrigerator in a clean container. Boiling removes harmful bacteria in the water that may cause illness. You should throw away ice made during the time the advisory or notice was issued, as freezing does not kill bacteria.

Is the water safe for washing dishes, laundry, and bathing?
The water is safe for washing dishes, but you should use hot, soapy water (you may add one tablespoon of bleach per gallon as a precaution) and rinse dishes in boiled water. There are no restrictions on doing laundry. The water is also safe for bathing during an advisory or notice; unless otherwise indicated by the City.

How do I prepare food and baby formula?
Use boiled or bottled water only for drinking, cooking, making ice, washing fruits and vegetables, brushing teeth, making baby formula, bathing and cleaning.

Breast feed your baby or use ready-made formula. If you must use water to make formula, use bottled water. If you don’t have bottled water, use water that has been rapidly boiled for at least two (2) minutes.

What about my pets?
You should follow the same boiling water procedures for your pet as you would for yourself.

How long will the need to boil water continue?
Public notification will be given when a boil water notice or order is lifted. We expect this this event to last for 24 to 48 hours but can be longer and may last for several days or more. How long depends on the conditions that caused the need to boil, how quickly the conditions are corrected, and how long it takes for laboratory results to confirm it is safe to return to normal water use. Denton Water Utilities will provide updates on the progress of corrective actions and how long the event is expected to last.

What do I need to do when the notice has been lifted?
When it is no longer necessary to boil the water, the water system officials will notify you that the water is safe for consumption. Instructions to discontinue boiling will be issued in the same manner as this notice. After an advisory or notice has been lifted (if water contamination did occur), you should flush household pipes, ice makers, water fountains, etc. prior to using for drinking or cooking. Flushing simply means letting the water run to ensure that no contaminated water remains in your pipes. Follow the following guidelines for flushing:

  • Run all cold water faucets in your home for one minute
  • To flush automatic ice makers, make three batches of ice and discard
  • Run water softeners through a regeneration cycle

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Boil Water Notice for Customers south of IH35, north of Highland Park Road, west of Kendolph Drive and east of Western Boulevard within the City of Denton

 October 17, 2019

Due to an unauthorized cross-connection between a stormwater pond and the City’s public water distribution system on the University of North Texas campus near Apogee Stadium, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality has required the City of Denton public water system to notify all customers to boil their water prior to consumption (e.g., washing hands/face, brushing teeth, drinking, etc). Children, seniors, and persons with weakened immune systems are particularly vulnerable to harmful bacteria, and all customers should follow these directions.

To ensure destruction of all harmful bacteria and other microbes, water for drinking, cooking, and ice making should be boiled and cooled prior to use for drinking water or human consumption purposes. The water should be brought to a vigorous rolling boil and then boiled for two minutes.

In lieu of boiling, individuals may purchase bottled water or obtain water from some other suitable source for drinking water or human consumption purposes.

When it is no longer necessary to boil the water, the public water system officials will notify customers that the water is safe for drinking water or human consumption purposes.

Once the boil water notice is no longer in effect, the public water system will issue a notice to customers that rescinds the boil water notice in a manner similar to this notice.

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

If you have questions concerning this matter, you may contact Frank Pugsley, Water Utilities Director at 940-349-8086, or Kenneth Banks, General Manager of Utilities at 940-349-7165, 215 E. McKinney Street, Denton Texas 76201.

The City of Denton Water Utilities Metering and Cross-Connection Department was notified by University of North Texas staff of an unauthorized cross-connection made at approximately 3:30 P.M. on Thursday October 17, 2019.

The impacted area is south of IH35, north of Highland Park Road, west of Kendolph Drive and east of Western Boulevard.

The City of Denton was notified by University of North Texas staff that an irrigation pump was inadvertently connected from a stormwater pond to the potable water distribution system. At approximately 4:00 P.M. City Utilities staff began closing water distribution system valves to isolate the impacted area. Extensive water distribution flushing at fire hydrants will continue for several hours. The City of Denton Municipal Laboratory personnel mobilized the afternoon of Thursday October 17 to begin collecting bacteriological samples to confirm water quality meets regulatory standards in the impacted area. The City maintains disinfectant within the water delivered by the distribution system to safeguard against bacteriological contamination.

Source: City of Denton